Common Concerns

So, What's in your Latch book, Robin?

So, What's in your Latch book, Robin?

Since we announced the release of my new book, Latch: A Handbook to Breastfeeding with Confidence at Every Stage, many of our readers have asked what they can expect to find in the book. 

Well, let me tell you!

 

First we start off with how to prepare for breastfeeding.  Most of us spend months preparing for the birth of our child, but don't give much thought about what happens after our baby is born.  So, this book starts off with the basics of how milk production works, all about latching, as well as how to put together your Dream Team of Support for once your little one is earth side.

Breastfeeding at 3-4 Months - It Can Look Very Different!

Written by Ashley Treadwell, IBCLC

Running two support groups every week, I get all sorts of questions from moms with concerns about their breastfeeding babies.  One of the questions/concerns I hear the most often is this: “My baby is suddenly not feeding for nearly as long as they used to and they aren’t interested in feeding as often.  They get fussy easily at the breast and pull off after just a few minutes.  I’m concerned that they aren’t getting enough milk from me!”  I can almost always predict the age of these babies - somewhere around 12-16 weeks.  And here’s why.

Many moms know that babies feed frequently in the early weeks.  They expect feedings around the clock that can last quite a while.  What many moms don’t realize is that this *can* change dramatically around the 3-4 month mark.  Babies who used to feed every 1 to 3 hours, for 30 minutes or more, babies who were always happy to breastfeed when offered - suddenly start refusing the breast at times, and when they do accept, may only feed for a few minutes before pulling off.  This can be a frustrating time for moms as they are often concerned that the baby may not be getting enough and are worried about this significant change in baby’s feeding patterns.  In this article, we’ll discuss why this happens, how to know if there is reason for concern, as well as how to manage this new behavior.

Witching Hour vs Colic

Colic is a word that is often used for a baby who cries for any length of time, but did you know that it’s normal for babies to have a fussy period every day, often called the witching hour?  While it’s distressing for any parent to hear her baby cry, sometimes understanding that the behavior is a normal part of infant development can be helpful.  However, there are times when the behavior may be caused by something else, and even though the cause isn’t always immediately understood, there are measures that can be taken to reduce the symptoms of colic.

Breastfeeding Your Baby with Jaundice

Written by Danielle Blair, IBCLC

The term jaundice gets used a lot regarding babies.  It can have many different meanings depending on the context.  From the Mayo Clinic website:

“Infant jaundice is a yellow discoloration in a newborn baby's skin and eyes. Infant jaundice occurs because the baby's blood contains an excess of bilirubin, a yellow-colored pigment of red blood cells.”

 

Does Your Baby Have a Tongue or Lip Tie?

Painful, cracked, compressed-after-breastfeeding nipples.  Baby not gaining weight well.  Constant breastfeeding sessions that seem to take over an hour.  Excessive baby fussiness and gas.  These are some of the many signs that your child may have a tongue and/or lip tie.  So, what is a tongue and lip tie and how do they affect breastfeeding? What are ways to fix them and improve breastfeeding?

With several fantastic articles already written on this subject, we are going to give brief answers to these questions and link to our favorite comprehensive resources.  Also, over the next month, we will be sharing stories from breastfeeding mothers whose babies had tongue and/or lip ties.

Baby Jaws - Breastfeeding a Teething (or Toothy!) Baby

Duh Nuh Duh Nuh………….Duh Nuh Duh Nuh. (come on, you know you just read that out loud).  

You know they’re coming.  You’ve heard all the severe warnings from well-intentioned friends and family.  You’re scared of what’s to come, but know you’ve gone too far to turn back.  Shark-infested waters, you ask?  Noooooo - a breastfeeding baby who has grown TEETH!  

Somewhere around 6-8 months (sometimes earlier, sometimes later), your baby’s first tooth will erupt.  This is most likely an event you will celebrate, both because of the milestone that it is, but also because it may be a temporary break from the cranky, drooly, mouthy baby who replaced your own sweet one a couple of months back.  There are lots of symptoms that point to teething, but the most common ones are: red and swollen gums, increased irritability and drooling, sleep disturbances, and low grade fevers.  Your baby has most likely learned that chewing or gumming on items helps ease the pain and will try to cram everything within reach into his/her mouth.  As that tooth begins to emerge, there may be some small worries creeping in on your excitement about this next stage.  What will it be like to breastfeed a baby with teeth?  Will my baby bite me? Some moms will find that they do start to feel the baby’s teeth while nursing - baby may scrape teeth across nipple when latching or delatching.  And yes, sometimes the baby will bite.

I’ve Had My Baby - Now What?: Breastfeeding During the First Week

Welcome to our new series, I’ve Had My Baby - Now What?  This is a guide with basic information to help you navigate the first days, weeks, and months of breastfeeding your new baby.  

 

Today we would like to talk about that first week after your baby has arrived.  Breastfeeding can often seem overwhelming and  unfamiliar.  New moms often receive a *huge* amount of differing advice from many well-intentioned people, which can be incredibly confusing and discouraging.  Below is a quick guideline to what “normal” breastfeeding looks like, as well as some examples of when things aren’t going as they should and when you might want to seek help.

Common Concerns While Breastfeeding - What is That White (and painful!) Spot on My Nipple?

Welcome back to our blog series…. Common Concerns While Breastfeeding.  These aren’t the complicated, ‘come-to-my-house-immediately’ phone calls we receive.  Rather, these are the questions that come from clients and friends in the middle of the night, by text or by email, that don’t necessarily warrant a lactation consultation.  They can often be easily resolved with a few simple tricks.  So, we would like to share those tricks with you!

 

Many moms know the pain associated with a shallow latch during the early days, but have you ever had nipple pain suddenly begin after weeks or months of pain-free breastfeeding?  After checking nipples for signs of a poor latch, you notice a white spot on the nipple in question - you pick at it for a few seconds, but it still remains.  What is it?  What caused it?  What can you do to resolve it and get back to pain-free breastfeeding?  This is what’s called a “milk blister” or “milk bleb” and is not cause for great concern, but it can be an uncomfortable and unwelcome guest!

What Every Mom Should Know About Breastfeeding During the Early Weeks

How much breast milk does my baby need per feeding?
What is common nursing behavior for a newborn?
How will I know that my baby is getting enough?

As a new mom, these are common questions that you may ask your pediatrician, midwife, postpartum nurse, family, and friends and GUESS WHAT..... they may all have a different answer!  

Keeping Up Your Milk Supply During the Holiday Season

Since Winter Break has descended onto our homes, Ashley and I are taking the next few weeks off from blogging to spend some quality time with our families.  However, that doesn't mean that you'll be left without our breastfeeding support until the new year!  We have over 300 articles on the San Diego Breastfeeding Center blog, which means there is no reason for you to google 'sore nipples' at 3:30am.  Just check out our extensive article list and you will be well on your way!

Here are some of our favorite tips for keeping up your milk supply during the holidays